Happy Friday 13th

I suppose it makes me strange to say that I love this day…. yeah, it does. I just want to listen to eerie songs…. I’d recommend The Animals ‘I Put A Spell On You’

It’s got that faded, recording sound most 60s music does… and the vocals are really unbeatable..
The movie ‘Stake Land’ is also pretty neat. Nothing too high budget, but it’s got the perfect rainy day crazy feel…..
Anyways.

I seem strangely enough to have really uncharacteristically good days on Friday 13th. However, I am and will always be a terrible superstitious person. And addicted to anything supernatural and unexplained and blah blah…

But It did get me thinking, what got all of this stuff spreading around anyways? Is it like Halloween? Grim brothers? Stigmata? …. What is Friday the 13th and why does it get EVERYONE in Western Civilization in SUCH an uproar? What are the urban legends saying and how viable is their truths?

My dear friends at Wikipedia had this to say:

  • In numerology, the number twelve is considered the number of completeness, as reflected in the twelve months of the year, twelve hours of the clock, twelve gods of Olympus, twelve tribes of Israel, twelve Apostles of Jesus, the 12 successors of Muhammad in Shia Islam, twelve signs of the Zodiac, etc., whereas the number thirteen was considered irregular, transgressing this completeness. There is also a superstition, thought by some to derive from the Last Supper or a Norse myth, that having thirteen people seated at a table will result in the death of one of the diners.
  • Records of the superstition are rarely found before the 20th century, when it became extremely common. The connection between the Friday the 13th superstition and the Knights Templar was popularized in Dan Brown’s 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code and in John J. Robinson’s 1989 work Born in Blood: The Lost Secrets of Freemasonry. On Friday, 13 October 1307, hundreds of the Knights Templar were arrested in France, an action apparently motivated financially and undertaken by the efficient royal bureaucracy to increase the prestige of the crown. Philip IV was the force behind this ruthless move, but it has also tarnished the historical reputation of Clement V. From the very day of Clement V’s coronation, the king falsely charged the Templars with heresy, immorality and abuses, and the scruples of the Pope were compromised by a growing sense that the burgeoning French State might not wait for the Church, but would proceed independently.
  • The renowned rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur was pronounced dead on September 13, 1996.

So, basically this has no known proof, no sort of a Supernatural origin besides 1. In numerology 13 is considered unlucky. The day is subjective, some say Friday, us latinas say Tuesday.

So, lets take a look at some numerology: What Is The Meaning of Numbers?

  • Numerology is the study of numbers, and the occult manner in which they reflect certain aptitudes and character tendencies, as an integral part of the cosmic plan. Each letter has a numeric value that provides a related cosmic vibration. The sum of the numbers in your birth date and the sum of value derived from the letters in the name provide an interrelation of vibrations. These numbers show a great deal about character, purpose in life, what motivates, and where talents may lie. Experts in numerology use the numbers to determine the best time for major moves and activities in life. Numerology is used to decide when to invest, when to marry, when to travel, when to change jobs, or relocate.
  • Pythagoras, the Greek mathematician who lived from 569-470 B.C., is said by many to be the originator of much of what we call numerology today. The actual origins of numerology predate Pythagoras, the most popular being from the Hindu Vedas. In the twentieth century, the old science seems to magically reappear in the form of a series of books published from 1911-1917 by L. Dow Balliett and it was helped along in the 30’s by Florence Campbell, and within the next few decades a wealth of literature was available to the public. Indeed, if you look at the past 90 years, it would seem that the science has moved very rapidly. But perhaps all of this was known at a much earlier time, and it was just hiding from us for a while.

Different numbers define different characteristics. Numbers can change for us throughout our lives but the numbers we were born with influence our character, behaviour, strengths and weaknesses.


Our Spirit Guides are assigned to us from birth, and, whether we realise it or not, guide us and advise us in our daily lives. They wish us to develop and grow, personally and spiritually, so that we can reach our full potential, find our true natures, and find our place in the world. Our Spirit Guides want to open communication with us, to establish a dialogue, so that guidance, advice and answers are readily provided and understood at the right time. The most common way our Spirit Guides begin to open communications with us is through number sequences; in ancient times it would have been something else, like seeing a particular type of bird or other animal, but in the modern digital age, surrounded by numbers everywhere we look, Spirit Guides are using number sequences to communicate. We have found that this is the first way our Spirit Guides try to communicate with us, as we cannot ignore seeing a number sequence if it is being shown to us everywhere we look and everywhere we go; and numbers are so prevalent in the modern world.

For example, you may see 1111 or 1221 (thats my birthday!..imdone) every time you look at a clock, or be driving past a billboard and always be drawn to look at the 555 that is part of the telephone number.

… which of course got me looking.

Signs on the Spiritual Path

121, 1221, 2121, 2211, 1122 These signs indicate that your current train of thought is correct for your Spiritual Path. These thoughts are your focus and following these will lead you along your Spiritual Path. This can be expressed simply as, ‘You’re following your path!’.

So, naturally. Since these numbers follow me EVERYWHERE, I searched them…

12 because this is a lot to type

and then 21 i spose strange follows us all in some way

Get your life path here

Pay close attention to that the next time your watching a show or a movie that has a number in the title. Find out what that number means, it gives everything about that art work a new perspective. As well as sequence, we know the meanings of the numbers 12 and 21 but what does sequence mean? Sneaky little bastards these writers and such are…..

Which didnt mean shit to me… like? I’m getting of topic again…

Back to FRIDAY THE 13th

This is what urbanlegends.com has to say:

Legend has it: If 13 people sit down to dinner together, one will die within the year. The Turks so disliked the number 13 that it was practically expunged from their vocabulary (Brewer, 1894). Many cities do not have a 13th Street or a 13th Avenue. Many buildings don’t have a 13th floor. If you have 13 letters in your name, you will have the devil’s luck (Jack the Ripper, Charles Manson, Jeffrey Dahmer, Theodore Bundy and Albert De Salvo all have 13 letters in their names). There are 13 witches in a coven.

  • The Devil’s Dozen

Although no one can say for sure when and why human beings first associated the number 13 with misfortune, the superstition is assumed to be quite old, and there exist any number of theories — most of which deserve to be treated with a healthy skepticism, please note — purporting to trace its origins to antiquity and beyond.It has been proposed, for example, that fears surrounding the number 13 are as ancient as the act of counting. Primitive man had only his 10 fingers and two feet to represent units, this explanation goes, so he could count no higher than 12. What lay beyond that — 13 — was an impenetrable mystery to our prehistoric forebears, hence an object of superstition.
Which has an edifying ring to it, but one is left wondering: did primitive man not have toes?

  • Life and death

Despite whatever terrors the numerical unknown held for their hunter-gatherer ancestors, ancient civilizations weren’t unanimous in their dread of 13. The Chinese regarded the number as lucky, some commentators note, as did the Egyptians in the time of the pharaohs.

To the ancient Egyptians, we’re told, life was a quest for spiritual ascension which unfolded in stages — twelve in this life and a thirteenth beyond, thought to be the eternal afterlife. The number 13 therefore symbolized death, not in terms of dust and decay but as a glorious and desirable transformation. Though Egyptian civilization perished, the symbolism conferred on the number 13 by its priesthood survived, we may speculate, only to be corrupted by subsequent cultures who came to associate 13 with a fear of death instead of a reverence for the afterlife.

  • Anathema

Still other sources speculate that the number 13 may have been purposely vilified by the founders of patriarchal religions in the early days of western civilization because it represented femininity. Thirteen had been revered in prehistoric goddess-worshiping cultures, we are told, because it corresponded to the number of lunar (menstrual) cycles in a year (13 x 28 = 364 days). The “Earth Mother of Laussel,” for example — a 27,000-year-old carving found near the Lascaux caves in France often cited as an icon of matriarchal spirituality — depicts a female figure holding a crescent-shaped horn bearing 13 notches. As the solar calendar triumphed over the lunar with the rise of male-dominated civilization, it is surmised, so did the “perfect” number 12 over the “imperfect” number 13, thereafter considered anathema.

On the other hand, one of the earliest concrete taboos associated with the number 13 — a taboo still observed by some superstitious folks today, apparently — is said to have originated in the East with the Hindus, who believed, for reasons I haven’t been able to ascertain, that it is always unlucky for 13 people to gather in one place — say, at dinner. Interestingly enough, precisely the same superstition has been attributed to the ancient Vikings (though I have also been told, for what it’s worth, that this and the accompanying mythographical explanation of it are apocryphal).

… anyone else still like … and that blows this thing in a proportion of THIS SIZE? … really? However, the Tupac relation does seem enough. (;

This site seemed interesting enough

So, this got me thinking.. of all how parched my Bucket List is looking. And I figured.. maybe I should test my numerology … I mean if 12 and 21 is so great maybe It’ll love me enough to protect me through my admittedly stupid endeavors. Those being, lets find the most scariest, most riveting places, rich in Supernatural flavor… and spend the night.. on the 13th. If your reading this and you feel the need to do daredevil, slighty dangerous and foolish things as well. That you can tell your great-grandchildren how dashingly devil may care you were…. your more than welcome to tag along.

1. Monte Cristo, New South Wales, Australia

Monte Cristo, Australia’s most haunted mansion is located in Junee, New South Wales. Mrs Crawley, the owner of the house never came out of her home after the death of her husband in 23 years of her remaining life except for two times. After her death her ghost haunts the place particularly her former room. Bodiless ghost, phantom face in the window, floating apparition, strange and ghostly voices, automatic turning on and off lights are some haunting experiences of the people. Some people reported that when they entered the boy’s bed room they were breathless and turned purple and almost died, they became normal after coming out from the room.

2. Highgate Cemetery, North London, England

Highgate Cemetery

By night, Highgate Cemetery is like something out of a horror movie. Eerie crooked gravestones, headless angles covered in ivy, dark overgrown passages between the tombs, it’s no wonder this is Britain’s number-one ghost spot. Despite it’s chilling atmosphere, by day Highgate Cemetery showcases some of the Britain’s most spectacular Gothic architecture, offers fascinating guided tours. It’s also the burial place of Karl Marx.

3. Bhangarh Fort, India

Bhangarh Fort
Bhangarh Fort is on way from Jaipur to Alwar in Rajasthan, India. According to a legend, Singhia, a black magic tantrik cursed the palace that everybody would die in the palace and their souls will stay there for centuries without rebirth. Another interesting point is, all the houses in this area are without roofs because whenever a house is built with roof, the roof collapses. This is the called most haunting place in India. People who visit this place experience anxiety and restlessness. It is said that nobody returns from this place that stays there after dark. Government prohibited this area from staying after sunset. You will find a board installed by Archaeological Survey of India displaying “Staying after sunset is strictly prohibited in this area”.

4. Bran Castle, Romania

Situated near Bran and in the immediate vicinity of Braşov, is a national monument and landmark in Romania. The fortress is situated on the border between Transylvania and Wallachia, on DN73. Commonly known as “Dracula’s Castle” (although it is one among several locations linked to the Dracula legend, including Poenari Castle and Hunyad Castle) ‘Dracula’ impaled thousands at a time, sometimes making their agonizing torture go on for months until death would claim his victims. Castle Bran is renowned for its infamous claim to haunted fame. Tourists are welcomed to find out. The little chapel, or grotto, in the bottom right adds an extra creepy element. As requested in Queen Marie’s will, after her death, her heart was placed in a gold casket and buried in Balcic, later moved to this grotto by Bran Castle.
That last seems very Ann Rice of me.. but in my defense I’ve wanted to visit this castle long before Edward Cullen decided to sparkle.
I’d love to know what places make YOUR blood boil, what scares YOU the most about Friday the 13th?
Until then…
Keep it spooky
(:
Advertisements

One thought on “Happy Friday 13th

Add yours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

A WordPress.com Website.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: